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Dry Falls Washington State

Posted by Bruce (Tacoma, United States) on 22 July 2018 in Landscape & Rural and Portfolio.

Our granddaughter and I took a 3 day photo trip and this was one of our stops.

Dry Falls is a 3.5-mile-long (5,600 m), 5.5 km in width . According to the current geological model, catastrophic flooding channeled water at 65 miles per hour through the Upper Grand Coulee and over this 400-foot (120 m) rock face at the end of the last ice age. It is estimated that the falls were five times the width of Niagara, with ten times the flow of all the current rivers in the world combined.[3]

Nearly twenty thousand years ago, as glaciers moved south through North America, an ice sheet dammed the Clark Fork River near Sandpoint, Idaho. Consequently, a significant portion of western Montana flooded, forming the gigantic Lake Missoula. About the same time, Glacial Lake Columbia was formed on the ice-dammed Columbia River behind the Okanogan lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. Lake Columbia's overflow – the diverted Columbia River – drained first through Moses Coulee and as the ice dam grew, later through the Grand Coulee.

Eventually, water in Lake Missoula rose high enough to float the ice dam until it gave way, and a portion of this cataclysmic flood spilled into Glacial Lake Columbia, and then down the Grand Coulee. It is generally accepted that this process of ice-damming of the Clark Fork, refilling of Lake Missoula and subsequent cataclysmic flooding happened dozens of times over the years of the last Ice Age.

This sudden flood put parts of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon under hundreds of feet of water in just a few days. These extraordinary floods greatly enlarged the Grand Coulee and Dry Falls in a short period. The large plunge pools at the base of Dry Falls were created by these floods.

Once the ice sheet that obstructed the Columbia melted, the river returned to its normal course, leaving the Grand Coulee and the falls dry.

NIKON D7100 1/125 second F/11.0 ISO 200 18 mm (35mm equiv.)

dry | falls | washington | state

I appreciate all the comments – I find them very encouraging. My primary photography is flowers and landscapes along with my grandkids.

Most of my photos are, “as they were taken.” I do work with lighting or darkening them in many cases (and sometimes I will sharpen them) but I try not to use too much “photo-shopping” If I do adjust them – I try to mention it.

My goal is to I try to keep my photography as photography and not turn it into art. While I do love the retouched photos, I personally think they become art and not photography – just my opinion.

Existence Artistique from Angers, France

beau

22 Jul 2018 9:09am